3 seemingly unreasonable offseason moves that would actually make sense for the Boston Bruins

The Boston Bruins need more firepower to surpass the NHL’s best next season, but that could require some seemingly unreasonable transactions this offseason.
Apr 24, 2024; Toronto, Ontario, CAN; Boston Bruins forward Brad Marchand (left) and forward David Pastrnak (88) and goaltender Linus Ullmark (35) before warm-up of game three of the first round of the 2024 Stanley Cup Playoffs against the Toronto Maple Leafs at Scotiabank Arena. Mandatory Credit: John E. Sokolowski-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 24, 2024; Toronto, Ontario, CAN; Boston Bruins forward Brad Marchand (left) and forward David Pastrnak (88) and goaltender Linus Ullmark (35) before warm-up of game three of the first round of the 2024 Stanley Cup Playoffs against the Toronto Maple Leafs at Scotiabank Arena. Mandatory Credit: John E. Sokolowski-USA TODAY Sports / John E. Sokolowski-USA TODAY Sports
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While we can sit here and talk about a plethora of logical moves Boston Bruins general manager Don Sweeny can make this offseason, we should also discuss counterintuitive measures. There isn’t a single offseason transaction that fans will universally embrace, but there will be a majority of them approving of a few, or many. 

But Sweeney could do something that will make a fan wonder what the storied organization’s leader is thinking. That’s what we’re talking about today, because although some potential moves may look as though they make zero sense, they could also factor in as genius decisions. 

We’re talking about seemingly coming off of the wrong end in trades to one of those, “Why do they need that player,” type of signing. So what kind of eyebrow-raising moves might Sweeney conduct this summer, only to potentially benefit Boston in the long run? 

Trading Linus Ullmark for less compensation 

Trading Linus Ullmark in a blockbuster deal is the only thing that makes sense, right? Ideally, yes, so much that I put it onto the Bruins ultimate offseason checklist. But it doesn’t mean Ullmark needs to go for top-notch compensation for this to be a successful trade if it occurs. 

Listen, Ullmark is due $4.5 million this season, and the Bruins have an excellent goaltender in Jeremy Swayman. So moving Ullmark and getting little more than draft picks, prospects, and low-end NHL-caliber talents for him could help Boston in the short and long term. 

One reason is that Don Sweeney will have more money to work with in either free agency, or to re-sign someone like Jake DeBrusk. Or, he could funnel it into Swayman’s new contract, which is also a priority this summer. 

Plus, if the Bruins get more prospects and draft picks into the system, it will only help them when they need to make a trade at the deadline for either a rental or an established talent who they may keep around for a while. Hey, why not keep all options open, right?

I’m not saying that I’d rather see Ullmark go for lesser compensation, or else I wouldn’t have said the ideal route would be to include him in a blockbuster trade. Ullmark should bring a lot of value to the Bruins if they trade him, but that value can arrive in a few different ways, even if it’s not the ideal way.